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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too easy. the adversaries are now friends, really good friends. and when we asked to meet with them, they suggested a personal spot. david boyce's apartment in new york city. if anybody had said to me nine years ago that i would about to be interviewing the two men who fought each other tooth and nail in bush versus gore on the same side of a constitutional fight, i would have said, are you crazy? >> actuall
of the key civil rights issues of our time. the court announced today it will rule whether a federal law denying benefits to same-sex spouses is unconstitutional. >> the defense of marriage act, defining marriage as the legal union of one man and one woman. the court also announced it will decide where the california's proposition 8, which bans same-sex marriage, is constitutional. voters in california passed prop 8 four years ago but since then two courts have said it is unconstitutional. american's views on this issue have shifted rapidly, to where the majority of americans now support same-sex marriage. the cases will be heard in march. a ruling is expected in june. these decisions will have you judge for fairness in this country. one reporter described this case as the roe versus wade of gay rights. we have three special guests tonight. joining me now is richard, a former white house advicer to former president clinton and equality matters, a guy rights advocacy rights group. dustin, activist and award-winning screenwriter of the movie "milk." he's helped to lead the charge to overtu
have cast it as a civil right? >> i think that's definitely part of it, and pop culture is a big part of it. as, you know, seeing same-sex couples has become more normal, more mainstream. people are used to see it and more gay couples feel comfortable telling people around them this is who i am, this is my family. that really changes mores. there was already a huge generational gap but now we're seeing major shifts through all generations. for first time white catholics support -- a majority of white catholics support same-sex marriage. >> marco rubio was asked about his views on same-sex marriage. let me play you what he said. here he is. >> is homosexuality a sin? >> i can tell you what faith teaches and the faith teaches it is. as a policymaker, you know, i could just tell you that i'm informed by my faith and my faith informs me in who i am as a person, but not as a way to pass judgment on people. >> okay. so rubio says his faith informs him that its a sin but he's not going to cast judgment on others. he's not going to point the finger, but can rubio fight an election in that fud
jonathan turley on this historic civil rights battle. [ male announcer ] red lobster's hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15 entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oo! the tilapia with roasted vegetables! i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. that pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently! and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. [ male announcer ] we began serving handcrafted coffe
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in only the way she can. sued by civil rights groups for denying driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants who have been granted permits by the be obama administration to remain the in the united states. the deferred action program allows undocumented immigrants under 31 to avoid deportation if they arrived here before turning 16, have been in the country five straight years and are in school or have graduated from high school or a geds program or served in the military. brewer who has battled the obama administration over her state's immigration policies insists she's obeying laws. >> the state is the one that licenses the people to be able to drive on the streets. it's not the federal government. i'm not surprised i'm being sued, but that's the law and i'm going to obey my oath of office. >> it is worth noting that according to the arizona republic, the state already grants licenses to noncitizens with work permits. brewer seems to be singling out those who have received their permits through the department of homeland security's executive action. translation, jan brewer is pi
, who if they are looking for a civil rights campaign, this is it it. those athletes who are sick and tired of this, i think this is their civil rights campaign. to get guns off the street. >> i'm a sportsman. i have firearms. i hunt deer and pheasants and all that kind of stuff. you want law-abiding citizens to give up their rights to own firearms at this point? that's a fair question. >> it is a fair question. and i take every opportunity to emphasize. i'm glad you asked it again. absolutely not. >> well then you have a law-abiding citizen who happened to be an nfl player who gets a great deal of visibility because of this tragic incident. should he have not been able to own a firearm? >> the 2nd amendment has been decided by the sue -- supreme court. it's within his right to own a firearm. he should have been aware of the risks associated with it. i think there's an education job we need to do there. we need to have an honest conversation about the risks and dangers associated with firearms. and we need to do what we can from a policy perspective to keep the guns out of the han
jonathan turley on this historic civil rights battle. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." one thing about republicans, they never give up. there's an assault on middle class workers going on in the state of michigan. it's a replay of what happened in wisconsin. governor rick snyder, backed by the koch brothers is attempting to bust unions in the state where the modern labor movement began. on thursday, michigan republicans rammed through right-to-work legislation. it prohibits paying union dues as a condition of employment, but won't apply to existing union contracts. the bill is expected to pass next week. this is a complete political stealth attack by governor snyder. he never campaigned on a right to work law and the bill passed with little or no debate. that's what is infuriating people. republicans used a dirty trick to avoid a recall vote on the law. they included spending in the bill because laws with spending can't be overturn bade citizen vote such as a referral. so this sneak attack on labor has people in michigan absolutely outraged. took a lot of calls on it on the radio show.
holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation southern manifesto in 1956 and went on to right the civil rights act of 1964. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> and which political story will make head leans in 24 hours contributor and manager editor, chris cizzilis rejoins us. when do you think they get down to seriously talking and you keep hearing that there's some optimism here of people who are really smart players. it's hard to find the signs of it. >> well, andrea, i would predict they won't in 24 hours. look. i do think -- i think the reason for optimism that you hear is because people don't believe politicians will willingly put themselves in a situation of tremendous uncertainty. that is, going over the cliff. no one knows what would happen. we all think, oh, there's economists saying it wo
of the arc of history and civil rights, given the fact that they're taking up both doma and prop 8. i wonder where you think roberts fits into all this. >> based on some of the other decisions he has made, i don't think he is quite as conservative as some people think. i think taking up the doma case is really important because we really need to have the defense of marriage act struck down. marriage in the states is great. but at the end of the day, there is an awful lot of benefits that come from the federal tax code, that people who get married need to enjoy if you're going to have a fair and equitable situation in society. so i think they made a big step forward here. and, you know, the court is a hard place to read. unfortunately, it's not like the election. well don't have nate silver to read every morning to tell us how it's going to turn out. but we'll all be watching closely. >> chris, there is a third issue that the justices haven't taken up yet, and that's an arizona law that bars some same-sex spouses from access to state benefits. where do we go on that? what happens to that issu
be the civil rights cases and generation. the supreme court decided to take up two challenges to same-sex marriage. pete williams live in washington. pete, with a good morning to you, let's get all the details on these cases from you. fill us in. >> this is a very big deal, alex. the supreme court has never before in its history agreed to take a serious look at the issue of same-sex marriages and now it's going to be doing that the justices will look at two questions. first, can the federal government refuse to recognize these marriages in the states where they are already legal and secondly, what's to come of them in california. >>> just a day after washington state become the latest allowing gay couples to get married, the supreme court said it will delve into one of the nation's most hotly debated issues. >> the highest court in the land has decided to take up what will be one of the biggest civil rights cases that this court could ever hear. >> the court agreed to take up the legal battle over california's proposition 8 passed by voters four years ago ending same-sex marriage in t
and civil rights renaissance. we have seen extraordinary leadership from other parts of government already. don't we judge, chris, presidents by whether they stand up to the moment of history in which they live? we have seen president obama step up to this issue, gay marriage -- >> getting rid of don't ask, don't tell. now saying he won't endorse doma. >> and our military has stepped up. >> even the marines are doing a great job. >> even the marines are. now we have to see will the supreme court also keep pace in our time with the other major institutions. >> chad, you're the expert. i've supported it, my wife has for years, the human rights campaign. you have a hell of a name, human rights campaign. it's a great name. the liberty clause. if you get to the idea of the 14th amendment. life, liberty, and property cannot be denied to you. except through due process of the law. you have to do something wrong. it's got to be a crime. you can't just be denied liberty. your thoughts on that issue and how that can be used in the constitution? >> that's exactly right. and there is no state interest
of a policy and civil rights renaissance. we have seen extraordinary leadership from other parts of government already. we -- don't we judge presidents by whether they stand tube the moment of history in which they live. we have seen president obama step up to this issue, gay marriage. >> "don't ask, don't tell" now saying he won't enforce doma. >> our military has stepped up. >> even the marines are doing a great job. >> even the marines are. now, we have to see, will the supreme court also keep pace in our time with the other major institutions. >> chad, you're the export. i supported it, my wife has for years. hrc, you have a hell of a great name, human rights campaign, great name. >> life, liberty and property cannot be denied except by due process of law. you have to break a law to lose your liberty. it has to be a crime. you can't be denied liberty, your thoughts on that issue and how that can be used in this constitution. >> that's exactly right. is there no state right. the plaintiffs in this case, the fundamental right to marriage. chris, oftentimes, we get lost a bit talking about th
, whether that's being on the wrong side of slavery, being on the wrong side of civil rights movement. being on the wrong side of giving women the right to vote. being on the wrong side of interracial marriage. at the end of the day, america is moving towards giving gay and lesbians, gay and lesbian americans the same rights to marry that all americans enjoy. and that is where the country is heading. that is a bow that cannot be untied no matter what the republican party does. >> mckay, it looks like the mormon church might also be moving at this point. they've got this new website out, sort of explaining a little more in detail their view on gay marriage and really urging a tremendous amount of tolerance, i think. what are your thoughts on that? >> yeah, this new website is mormons and gays.org. and it represents a pretty significant effort to reach out to gay mormons in particular and the broader gay community. you remember in 2008, the mormon church urged its members to get heavily involved in passing proposition 8, which banned gay marriage in california. and ever since then, the relatio
station back on new year aday in 2009. at 9:00, two civil rights lawyers will argue before the 9th sir coit court of appeals that b.a.r.t. police should not get legal immin tu from this lawsuit filed bay the -- ill munty from this lawsuit filed by the the -- immunity from this lawsuit filed by the family of oscar grant. >>> coming up at 7:47, how the kansas city chiefs and their community responded to the jovan belcher tragedy. >>> four people including three firefighters are still in the hospital this morning after a serious accident in other rin da. it happened on -- orinda. it happened on eastbound 24 near wilder road. it all started when an suv crashed into the center divide. while one of the drivers and three firefighters were standing on the right shoulder, another suv lost control pushing another car into them. they were all rushed to the hospital with major injuries. >>> the weekend storm brought major problems to the south bay and that had actuallity workers and law enforcement working overtime. a man, woman and child were were stuck in their car after flooding on east capita
that people make. >> we've come a long way baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
passion reached so far, it influenced the causes of civil rights and the thawing of the cold war. >> reporter: dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer whose career spanned eight decades. a classically trained pianist and composer formed his first band in 1951. eight years later the album "time-out." made his name a household name. it included a composition his saxophonist paul desmond wrote. "take five" with its catchy rhythms and unusual beat became brubeck's signature. it was the first album to sell a million copies. >> rhythm is an international language. >> reporter: his quartet played for presidents and foreign leaders setting the mood for the historic reagan-gorbachev summit in moscow. >> all these people that almost hated each other were swinging. >> reporter: brubeck also used his music to unite a racially divided america becoming one of the first white jazz musicians to play in all black clubs. >> the more has changed with artists, all kinds of artists, the better this world will be. >> reporter: he devoted his life to that goal. he died in norwalk, connecticut, one day before h
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
's really a civil rights issue? >> i don't know if i'm the one to ask. i don't think i'm even for heterosexual marriage. [ laughter ] >> i'm with mark. >> there's an economic benefit to this. obviously catering halls, wedding photographers, caterers, even divorce lawyers can make a lot of money here. the reason i think there has to be some federal law of ruling here, a marriage license has to be portable. people are going to prove state to state. clearly there are gay couples that need all kinds of protections. hospital visitation rights, civil protections of all kinds. i don't know if you call it the same as marriage but i'm starting to move more in that direction. >> stay put. we've got more work to do. 24 days until our economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff. just where do we stand on a deal coming out of washington, d.c.? cnbc correspondent joins us with all the details. >> reporter: as you know the white house's strategy since the election has been to break republican resistance on two issues. one is tax rates and one is an increase in the debt limit. he hasn't succee
of this next topic. we go to what could be the civil rights case of a generation or cases plural. the supreme court has decided to take up two challenges to same-sex marriage. nbc justice correspondent pete williams has the story from washington. hello, pete. >> reporter: alex this is a big deal. the u.s. supreme court has never been agreed to take a serious look at the issue of same-sex marriages. now it will. the justices will consider at least these two questions. can the federal government refuse to recognize same sex marges in the states they're already legal. secondly what's to become of them in california. just a day after washington state became the latest allowing gay couples to get married, the supreme court said it will delve into one of the nation's most hotly debated issues. >> the highest court in the land has decided to take up what will be one of the biggest civil rights cases this court could ever hear. >> reporter: the court agreed to take up the legal battle over california's proposition 8, passed by voters four years ago ending same-sex marriage in the state. a firm appeal
that the civil rights of americans all 300 million of us should be taken away and we should be denied the right to own a gun that would be the only way to take it away from jovan belcher is to say no one can own a gun other than military or police. that's an outrageous suggestion. costas ought to be fired. >> larry it's ridiculous we're talking about firing a guy for trying to start a debate about how to control guns in this country. >> i don't want to talk about -- i want to leave the costas situation alone. he said what he said. what i want to talk about igor is the issue of violating the second amendment or greater gun regulation would have stopped this? i mean the question i have -- look, this guy was a big drinker. he suffered concussions. he use ad lot of pain killers. clearly, clearly he had huge mental and physical problems. how would the gun thing have played out if he couldn't have got end it? >> we don't know about this one case but we do know is in cases of domestic abuse you really do see this correlation that if there's a gun in the house the chances of death resulting from domest
by the president. the group of civil rights organizations has filed suit in response. on health care governor brewer has informed the federal government that it's up to them to set up health exchanges for the state's uninsured. states rights surrendered quite conveniently. we're back with anna marie and jonathan. the arizona republic found over 39,000 licenses and even state i.d.s were issued since 2006 to noncitizens who were presented federally issued employment authorizations. so is this another attempt by brewer to initial young immigrants who find themselves in this country, of course, through no fault of their own or does she just enjoy wagging her finger at the president? >> i don't know why that's a binary choice, martin. >> i apologize. that's not a nonsec nonnon sequ. >> i think she knows how to get in the paper. she represents a segment of the republican party that they should be ashamed of. and that they're going to have to deal with at some point. like she cannot be someone who is the future of the gop, let's face it. this is the kind of thinking that alienated so many lahtino vo
's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new york with the human rights and have been providing a lot of support in trying to stop this legislation. the speaker says she wants to pass it as a christmas gift for ugandans. >> it is the pipeline, moved through a certain lower form of government there working up for a vote within parliament. carrie, why does the rfk center want to highlight a sister like frank and what is taking place in uganda? in america we're celeb
is the thing, if you are gay and alive in our time in america, we're living in a kind of a policy and civil rights renaissance. we have seen extraordinary leadership from other parts of government already. don't we judge, chris, presidents by whether they stand up to the moment of history in which they live? we have seen president obama step up to this issue, gay marriage -- sgroo getting rid of don't ask, don't tell. now saying he won't endorse doma. >> and our military has stepped up. >> even the marines are doing a great job. >> even the marines are. now we have to see will the supreme court also keep pace in our time with the other major institutions. >> count me as an optimist here. i know there were questions. chad, you're the expert, i have supported it and my wife has for years, human rights campaign. you have a hell of a name, human rights campaign. it's a great name. the liberty clause. if you get to the idea of 14th amendment. life, liberty, and property cannot be denied to you. you have to do something wrong. it's got to be a crime. you can't just be denied liberty. your thought
of sight, with no public hearings. several public interest groups, civil rights organizations and labor unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownwnersp rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and ra
on the federal level. do you think the days of same-sex marriage being not recognized, unrecognized as a civil right, are coming to an end? >> i think the supreme court will make the decision. prior to this election, every vote has only been it's only made it through by a legislator, not the vote of the people. in california, the people voted it down. we'll see from the supreme court. >> how do you see it? >> marriage equality is part of america's future. we saw that in state after state in the last election. the supreme court will take up the issue, and i hope that they understand as most of us do that this is part of our future. marriage equality and the equal treatment of people who have made this decision is part of what america is all about. >> final point, senator durbin. susan rice. will she be the president's secretary of state nominee and could she get confirmed in the senate at this point? >> i can't say that because the president has not told me what his decision will be. there have been two excellent names mentioned, ambassador rice and my colleague, senator kerry. either one of th
. not only was he known for intricate rhythms, also he was a huge civil rights advocate and activist, i should say, as well. and he was one of the handful of white musicians, jazz musicians, in the 1950s. and you know, let's take a listen here of some of his songs. ♪ >> amazing. amazing. so i could just sit and listen to him all over again, for the entire show. i want to move on because i want to talk about we said that niemeye reshg w niemeyer was 104 but that's nothing compared to the world's oldest woman. >> bessie, who passed away at 116 and he's a georgia native. the world's oldest woman lived to be 122 and she's a french woman. all these individuals regardless of their circumstances and what they did in their lives, they left a legacy and that's the thing to remember here and they left their footprints and fingerprints all over their work. >> can you imagine, 122? >> i don't know. what would you do? >> whatever i wanted. 122, i'd do whatever i wanted and say whatever i wanted. all right. thank you. appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> how is the nfl playing with the recent player tr
was known for being one of the first supporters of civil rights. he died in beaumont after a sudden illness. he was widely known for this photograph standing behind president johnson as he's being sworn in aboard air force one in 1963. brooks was also in the dallas motorcade when jfk was shot. >>> president obama's chief speechwriter might be leaving. "the washington post" reports john favro is not clear if he'll write the president's inaugural address first. >>> where is jan brewer? she notified her office she'd be gone for a week but didn't say where she'd be going. her staff says it is official business. >>> two big milestones for women, congressman nita lowie will be the ranking democrat, making her the highest in that ki committee's history and elizabeth warren is expected to be named to the senate banking committee. according to the "wall street journal" it could be a signal from the democrats to wall street to watch out. >>> we're barely out of the november 2012 elections and there's talk what big names you could see in the ballot box ahead. richard lui is here with that. >> that's t
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
that every, kind of a civil right. every worker should have that right in my opinion. bill: you're of the free economics mind anyway. >> that's true. bill: you will argue this will help michigan's economy, in a word you're saying yes? >> definitely. bill: matt, what do you think impact of the law could be? >> if you look at numbers, bill, steve hit it right on the head. 2001 to 2011, look at right to work states. inflation adjusted compensation rose private sector employees 12%, versus nonright to work states only increased by 3%. what happens when you make more money you increase the amount of people that want to move to your state. in that same time frame again, look at right to work states, saw the population from 25 to 34 increase 11.3%. in nonright to work states, increase .6. what all the numbers mean, more people move to your state, more tax revenue, more jobs, more companies coming there. if you put it together it is great for the local economy. bill: here are some more numbers and these are staggering, guys. unemployment in michigan is 9%. you know, across the country,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)